Vampires Never Get Old

Vampires Never Get Old

Tales With Fresh Bite

Book - 2020 | First edition.
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Eleven fresh vampire stories from young adult fiction's leading voices! In this delicious new collection, you'll find stories about lurking vampires of social media, rebellious vampires hungry for more than just blood, eager vampires coming out--and going out for their first kill--and other bold, breathtaking, dangerous, dreamy, eerie, iconic, powerful creatures of the night. Welcome to the evolution of the vampire--and a revolution on the page. Vampires Never Get Old includes stories by authors both bestselling and acclaimed, including Samira Ahmed, Dhonielle Clayton, Zoraida Córdova, Natalie C. Parker, Tessa Gratton, Heidi Heilig, Julie Murphy, Mark Oshiro, Rebecca Roanhorse, Laura Ruby, Victoria 'V. E.' Schwab, and Kayla Whaley.

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Adib is loving this book from a Kansas City author. He thinks we need the flip side of Twilight.

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l
lyderz
Mar 27, 2021

I picked up this anthology because one of my favorite authors, V.E. Schwab, is featured in it and her story “First Kill” is getting a Netflix adaptation. Other than that, I didn’t go into this book with any sort of expectations. I’ve been stressed out because of midterms so I just wanted something light and entertaining to read, and this book was exactly what I needed. These stories are full of diversity, they include fresh imaginings of the vampire that I have never considered before, and they explored some classic vampire lore. Overall, I had fun with this book but I did reach a slump in the middle. It was the fact that Schwab’s story was at the end that kept me going. The thing with these stories is that a lot of them left me wanting more, I felt unsatisfied for most of them, but I think that might be a me problem... maybe I just have to learn to appreciate short stories for what they are. I have a hard time reviewing this book as a whole because I liked some of the stories a lot better than others, so I broke it all down and ranked them from most favorite to least favorite, with a one or two sentence review for each.

Ranking:
1) “The Boy and the Bell” by Heidi Heilig: This one was by far my favorite. I loved the Victorian setting, I was pretty much instantly attached to Will, it was atmospheric, and the writing felt sophisticated and chilling.

2) “First Kill” by V.E. Schwab: We’ve got a classic case of “do I want to kill you or kiss you??” and a blurring of lines between good and evil. I’m super excited to see where this story goes in the adaptation and I love how Cal and Jules’ narratives parallel each other.

3) “Seven Nights for Dying” by Tessa Gratton: I really liked the blunt writing style, the unique creation ritual, and the fact that it was focused on choice rather than a big vampire reveal. I think it was a strong opening and I even got choked up.

4) “The Boys From Blood River” by Rebecca Roanhorse: I really felt for Lukas... he is so flawed and he knows it too. Also, I can’t even blame him for getting so caught up in Silas because I would take one look into those eyes and forget to see the monster underneath too.

5) “The House of Black Sapphires” by Dhonielle Clayton: This one was so descriptive and absolutely magical, I liked the character dynamics but it left me with a lot of questions.

6) “Bestiary” by Laura Ruby: This one was so unexpected, basically the world is ending and a lonely vampire girl finds solace among animals. Jude was likable in a sad way, I felt for her.

7) “Mirrors, Windows & Selfies” by Mark Oshiro: This one was good! I don’t usually like stories that are structured like… blog posts… but this one worked. I got really invested in Cisco super fast.

8) “A Guidebook for the Newly Sired Desi Vampire” by Samira Ahmed: Okay this one was fun, sarcastic, and a whole new vibrant take on 21st century vampirism, with the inclusion of serious undertones as well.

9) “In Kind” by Kayla Whaley: I liked Seanan, she was kind which is so unlike many vampires. This one had decent writing and explored a heavy topic.

10) “Vampires Never Say Die” by Zoraida Cordova and Natalie C. Parker: Featuring a real life vampire catfishing a teenage twihard, what could go wrong? This one was alright, I liked the glimpse of the vampire politics of New York.

11) “Senior Year Sucks” by Julie Murphy: I liked the concept of the resurrection home and the town history, but the whole thing felt rushed and I wasn’t a fan of the writing style.

s
seattle6565
Oct 28, 2020

It was alright - the most memorable to me were the last three. If you are to read any of the short stories in this book, definitely make it the last three.

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