Mr. Rosenblum Dreams in English

Mr. Rosenblum Dreams in English

A Novel

Downloadable Audiobook - 2010
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At the start of World War II, Jack and Sadie Rosenblum flee Berlin for London with their baby daughter, Elizabeth. Upon arrival, Jack receives a pamphlet from the German Jewish Aid Committee on how to act like a proper Englishman. He follows it to the letter. Saville Row suits, the BBC, trips to Covent Garden, a Jaguar, and it works like a charm. The Rosenblum's settle into a prosperous new life. Just one item on the list eludes him: An Englishman must be a member of a golf course. No golf course in England at the time will admit a Jew. But the list is now the guiding document in Jack's life, and he must check off the final item. So he decides to build his own golf club in the Dorset countryside. For the second time, Sadie leaves a home she loves. And despite ancient customs, British snobbery, mythical beasts, and a shrinking bank account, they triumph once again.
Publisher: [United States] : HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books : Made available through hoopla, 2010.
Edition: Unabridged.
ISBN: 9781615731114
1615731113
Branch Call Number: eAudiobook hoopla
Characteristics: 1 online resource (1 audio file (10hr., 30 min.)) : digital
Additional Contributors: Adams, James
Alternative Title: hoopla (Digital media service)
Call Number: eAudiobook hoopla

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hellandback
Aug 02, 2013

Suggested as a read-alike (Major Pettigrew's Last Stand; The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry) by our spectacular Fiction Librarian team, I settled in to be charmed by the eccentricity of an elderly gentleman in the UK. In common with those others, it does have an elderly man in England with some unusual ideas about how to spend his precious remaining years, and it is peppered with salty eccentrics in the tame English countryside. Check. But in this one, the elderly gentleman is not English, but wishes profoundly to become one. After escaping from the horrors of Nazi Germany, Jack Rosenblum and his wife, Sadie scrape by in London until Jack stumbles upon some surplus carpeting that he turns for a profit and eventually owns and operates his own carpet-making factory. Upon entering the UK, the German Jews were given a list of cultural and social differences to be made aware of and to help the new immigrants to assimilate. Jack expands this list for his own edification and delights in checking off each item. But he hits a roadblock with one - an Englishman belongs to a golf club - because none of the local clubs would accept Jewish members in the 1950s. He is determined to complete his list, and decides to build his own course in the Dorset countryside, where he purchases property and commences the almost Sisyphean task at first with the mockery and vandalism of the locals, and then slowly, with their support and admiration. Culminating in the inaugural match on the day of QE2's coronation, it comes to a bittersweet conclusion that is sweetly satisfying. Definitely recommended for those who liked the other read-alikes, and for any Anglophile delighting in a serio-comic fish-out-of-water story.

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h
hellandback
Aug 02, 2013

Suggested as a read-alike (Major Pettigrew's Last Stand; The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry) by our spectacular Fiction Librarian team, I settled in to be charmed by the eccentricity of an elderly gentleman in the UK. In common with those others, it does have an elderly man in England with some unusual ideas about how to spend his precious remaining years, and it is peppered with salty eccentrics in the tame English countryside. Check. But in this one, the elderly gentleman is not English, but wishes profoundly to become one. After escaping from the horrors of Nazi Germany, Jack Rosenblum and his wife, Sadie scrape by in London until Jack stumbles upon some surplus carpeting that he turns for a profit and eventually owns and operates his own carpet-making factory. Upon entering the UK, the German Jews were given a list of cultural and social differences to be made aware of and to help the new immigrants to assimilate. Jack expands this list for his own edification and delights in checking off each item. But he hits a roadblock with one - an Englishman belongs to a golf club - because none of the local clubs would accept Jewish members in the 1950s. He is determined to complete his list, and decides to build his own course in the Dorset countryside, where he purchases property and commences the almost Sisyphean task at first with the mockery and vandalism of the locals, and then slowly, with their support and admiration. Culminating in the inaugural match on the day of QE2's coronation, it comes to a bittersweet conclusion that is sweetly satisfying. Definitely recommended for those who liked the other read-alikes, and for any Anglophile delighting in a serio-comic fish-out-of-water story.

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